FMSD Consumer Notification of Lead Test and Results

Jan
09

 

PA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

BUREAU OF SAFE DRINKING WATER

 

CONSUMER NOTICE OF TAP WATER RESULTS

Dear Consumer,

Fannett-Metal School District is a public water system, because we are responsible for providing you with water at this location and ensuring that the drinking water we provide to you meets state and federal standards. The following table provides information on the tap location, date, and water sample result.

Drinking Water Sample for Lead
Location Date                      Result      ppb
02 (Elem Kitchen Sink) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
06 (Elem Dishwasher) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
07 (Elem Fountain Cafeteria) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
08 (Elem Upper Lobby Fountain) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
09 (Elem Lower Fountain) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion

 

Drinking Water Sample for Lead
Location Date                      Result      ppb
01 (HS Kitchen Sink) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
04 (HS Gym Hallway Fountain) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
10 (HS Dishwasher) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
11 (HS Fountain Upper Hallway) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion
12 (HS Fountain Lower Hallway) 9/18/19 less than 5 parts per billion

 

The 90th percentile value for our water system is below the lead action level of 15 parts per billion.

What Does This Mean?

Under the authority of the Safe Drinking Water Act, EPA set the action level for lead in drinking water at 15 ppb. This means utilities must ensure the water from the taps used for human consumption do not exceed this level in at least 90 percent of the sites samples (90th percentile value). The action level is the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. If water from the tap exceeds this limit, then the utility must take certain steps to correct the problem. Because lead may pose serious health risks, the EPA set a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) of zero for lead. The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is a no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

What Are The Health Effects of Lead?

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women. Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother’s bones, which may affect brain development.

What are The Sources of Lead?

The primary sources of lead exposure for most children are deteriorating lead-based paint, lead-contaminated dust and lead-contaminated residential soil. Exposure to lead is a significant health concern, especially for young children and infants whose growing bodies tend to absorb more lead than the average adult. Although our facility’s drinking water lead levels were below the action level, if you are concerned about lead exposure in your home, you should ask your health care provider about testing your children to determine levels of lead in their blood.

What Can I Do to Reduce Exposure to Lead in Drinking Water?

Although the test results were below EPA’s action level, you may still want to take steps to further reduce your exposure.

  • Run your water to flush out lead. If water hasn’t been used for several hours, run water for 15-30 seconds to flush out interior plumbing or until it becomes cold or reaches a steady temperature before using it for drinking or cooking.
  • Use cold water for cooking and preparing baby formula.

Do not boil water to remove lead.

For More Information

Call us at (717) 349-3017 For more information on reducing lead exposure around your home and the health effects of lead, visit EPA’s website at: www.epa.gov/lead, call the National Lead Information Center at 800424-LEAD, or contact your health care provider.